Emergencies

Toothaches

A toothache in a child could occur due to multiple possibilities. It could be related to a deep cavity, a possible nerve infection, a loose baby tooth, something caught between their teeth, a canker sore or trauma. Read More

If your child is complaining of pain, rinse your child’s mouth with warm water and inspect the area to make sure nothing is stuck between your child’s teeth. If the toothache persists, contact our office for an evaluation. Do not place aspirin or any type of pain medication on the gum tissue or on the aching tooth because this could burn the gums. You can use children’s over-the-counter pain medications to alleviate the pain such as Ibuprofen or Tylenol.

Cut lip or cheek

Have your child bite on a piece of gauze for 10-15 minutes and place a cold compress on the injured area. If the bleeding does not stop after 15 minutes contact our office or go to emergency room immediately.

Bumped baby or permanent tooth

Contact our office immediately to make sure the tooth hasn’t fractured and the surrounding areas are safe. An x-ray may be taken to make sure the root of the tooth is not broken.

Knocked out baby tooth

This is usually not a serious emergency. A lot of times the baby tooth was already wiggly to begin with. However, if unsure, contact our office for an evaluation and to make sure there aren’t any remaining tooth fragments left behind in the gum tissue. Baby teeth are not reimplanted back into its socket due to the risk of injuring the developing permanent tooth. Read More

It is normal to see a lot of blood in your child’s mouth due to the mixing of blood and saliva together. You can use children’s over-the-counter pain medications to alleviate the pain.

Knocked out permanent tooth

First, if possible, find the tooth. If found, handle the tooth by its crown (the top portion of the tooth) and rinse it gently with water. DO NOT scrape any debris or remaining tissue off the tooth. If possible, try to reinsert the tooth into the socket and hold the tooth in place with finger pressure or have your child bite down on a wash cloth. Read More

If unable to reinsert, place your child’s tooth in a cup of milk, child’s saliva or saline. Immediately contact our office. If you act quickly, it can increase your child’s chances in saving the tooth. You can use children’s over-the-counter pain medications to alleviate the pain.

Chipped or fractured tooth

Contact our office immediately. Rinse your child’s mouth with warm water and place a cold compress in the area to reduce any possible lip swelling. It is important to act quickly to increase the chances in saving the tooth, prevent an infection and reducing pain. If possible, try to locate the broken fragment and place in a cup of milk and bring it with you to the dental visit. You can use children’s over-the-counter pain medications to alleviate the pain.

Swelling

Contact our office immediately. Facial swelling could be related to a dental infection, also known as an abscess, a cut or facial trauma. Place a cold compress in the area to help reduce the swelling. Read More

Swelling that is around the eye or causes difficulty in breathing could be a serious emergency and it is important to take your child to the emergency room. Antibiotics may be indicated for treatment. You can use children’s over-the-counter pain medications to alleviate the pain.

Swelling

Take your child to the emergency room immediately.

Fractured Jaw

Place cold compress on the area and take your child to the emergency room immediately.

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Alpharetta & Johns Creek Children's Dentistry Insurance

For the convenience of our patients, we are in-network with most major dental insurances. If you have a dental benefit plan, please bring along your dental insurance card and current information with each of your child’s dental visits
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